Routering An Edge on a Sign plus Using Part of a Stencil

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve posted.  We are STILL waiting for our house to sell, quite a few showings but not any offers.  I feel so … stuck.  Also I am going crazy with not making things in the shop.  I have enough to move that I don’t really want more but, as you creative people know, there is a constant need to make something!

So, I will show some older signs and things and maybe work on something new just to get myself out of this rut.

Most of my signs have just plain 90 degree square edges, but sometimes I change it up with a router.  I LOVE my routers (I have three) and all the different bits that can make unlimited changes to a piece of wood.

The round over bit can be used in a few ways, depending on how much of the bit you use:

If you just want to round the top or bottom edge of your work, you set the bit so that only the curved part of the bit hits the wood.  (Round over bits come in different sizes for different thicknesses of wood)
You will get a rounded edge like this:
If you want top and bottom rounded you pass the router over both sides of your wood and get this:
However, if you want a small vertical edge along with the rounded edge you allow the vertical cutter on the bit to also hit the wood and you get this:
This is what I did with my “Welcome” sign.  I used the round over bit in my router, with the router hanging in the router table and the sign face down on the table.
I don’t do this in one pass, I usually make about four passes, starting with the bit lower in the table and just taking a small amount of wood off the four edges of the sign.  Then I raise the bit and take more wood off.  This is easier on the wood and the router and safer for the operator.
Here you can see the sign is face down (already painted, sorry I forgot to take a photo while I was routering):
You end up with a nice edging around your sign:
I first stained this wood with my steel wool and vinegar concoction and then painted over that with turquoise paint.  I sanded some of the paint off to distress the sign, then I used white paint on just a part of my “Paris Flea Market” stencil on each end of the sign.  Many stencils can be used in pieces to create different looks.  This one from Mudaritaville in full is quite different:
I hand painted “Welcome” in white with a grey edging:
This sign is 23″ long x 5 1/2″ wide.
Hope I’ve given some of you some ideas for your own creations!

                      Showing this at the following blog parties:              

Thanks to My Repurposed Life and  DIY Vintage Chic for featuring me!
Photobucket           DIY Vintage Chic

Building and Finishing a Step Stool – Part 3 with a GREAT OFFER

This is the design I put on my stool to make it extra special. I used a stencil from Muddaritaville which was provided to me at no cost, in exchange for trying it out and blogging about it. Their stencils are cut from 10 mil mylar and are strong and completely reusable. (I was NOT told what to say about the product, all results and opinions are my own) 
This is what I started with, and blogged about in my two previous posts:
I made this stool from pine, but you could use an old stool and use the same finishing techniques as I did.  Because mine was raw wood, first it was stained.  If your stool already has something on it you may not need the stain undercoat.  After staining it was painted with white milk paint. 
The bottom step looked to me like it needed something extra.  That is where the stencil came in. 
I taped the stencil on each side and then used a small stencil brush and black craft paint to fill in the cut out areas.
Normally, I hand paint designs on furniture and signs, but I thought it would be nice to try a stencil for a change.  I’m sure if I had hand painted it would have taken me well over an hour to trace the pattern and then paint it.  With this stencil, it took me only a couple of minutes!
Did you know that stencils are cut with bridging? These are the small areas that hold the pieces together that would otherwise fall out without the extra “bridges.”  You can see bridging here below in the “P” and also in the “a” of the word Paris:
Below you can see where I have filled in the bridges with a small brush:
Many people do not realize that the bridges are meant to be filled in, and don’t paint in the bridged area.  I suppose some people leave them unpainted by choice, but I’ve seen stencilled work where it is obvious that the letter or design should be painted where the bridging was.
After the painting I lightly sanded over the whole stencilled area:

 Here is the whole bottom step, so much nicer with the stencil, and so easy to use:

 I hand waxed the stool after sanding.

 Although this stool is new, it looks like it has been around for a long time, don’t you think?

As I said, I got my stencil from Muddaritaville. Muddaritaville has many stencils you can use on furniture or to make signs with. Please go to their website to see them all.

Muddaritaville is offering you a 20% discount on any stencil purchases totalling $25 or more, for being a reader of my blog.  You will need to go to the Muddaritaville website and use the coupon code “fyh” at the checkout.
I hope some of you take this opportunity to get a beautiful stencil to use in your creations.  Please share the results with me, which I will post at my blog.